Explore the Lake District by narrow gauge railway
A railway adventure to delight all age groups
Explore the Lake District by narrow gauge railway Seven miles of spectacular scenery to the foot of England’s highest mountains
A railway adventure to delight all age groups Discover our heritage fleet of narrow gauge steam and diesel engines
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All Aboard - Let's Plan Your Journey!

Meet the ‘La’al Ratty’

Welcome to the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway. Join us on a stunning seven-mile journey from Ravenglass, the only coastal village in the UNESCO World Heritage site, The Lake District National Park. Travel across the estuary, through the hills, past seven request stops, en route to our final destination, Dalegarth for Boot station.

Ravenglass Station

Ravenglass is the only coastal village located in two World Heritage sites, Lake District National Park and Frontiers of the Roman Empire. 

Station facilities include a viewing turntable, licensed café, gift shop, accessible toilets, a museum with interactive exhibits, children’s activity boxes and an outdoor children's play area. 

Take a ten-minute walk to view Ravenglass Roman Bath House which is known as ‘Walls Castle.’

Muncaster Mill

This water-powered corn mill is believed to date back to 1455. It is now a private residence. There are great views over the coastal estuary from here. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets will be available from here - cash only. 

Miteside Halt

This station is referred to as a “halt”. A “halt” in railway parlance is a small station with little or no facilities. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only.

Murthwaite Halt

This station is referred to as a “halt”. A “halt” in railway parlance is a small station with little or no facilities. It once serviced the Murthwaite stone crushing plant, which was formed in the 1920s to crush the granite from the quarries in the valley.

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only.

Irton Road

Formerly known as Hollowstones, after a nearby farmstead, the present building dates to 1876. It is the only original station building still in existence constructed from pink granite and red sandstone. 

This stop is a popular starting point for two of Wainwright’s walks that start and finish here, including Miterdale. This is a route favoured by Wainwright that takes in one of ‘Lakeland’s sweetest valleys’.  

The Green

There are many walks to suit all abilities that start here including Burnmoor Tarn, Scafell, Scafell Pike, and Blea Tarn via Hollin How. This station was first known as King of Prussia but during the First World War, it changed its name to Eskdale Green. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only. 

Fisherground Halt

This station is referred to as a “halt”. A “halt” in railway parlance is a small station with little or no facilities. There is a campsite here with excellent facilities for campers and tourers so you can stay a little longer. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only.

Beckfoot

This station was not part of the original line; it first opened when the railway became a preserved railway in 1960. 

Today, it is mainly used by walkers wishing to explore the fells and the exquisite nearby Blea Tarn, one of Wainwright's “Walks from Ratty”. Blea Tarn nestles on a granite shoulder at an altitude of 217m (712ft) under the slopes of Blea Tarn Hill. 

Dalegarth for Boot

The station lies within sight of England’s highest mountains, the Scafell range. It has not always been the terminus of the line, as the railway originally hauled iron ore from Nab Gill Mine. The remains of the rope worked inclined railway can be seen just to the left of the Boot Inn. 

It’s just a short walk into the village where you will find the Eskdale Mill. There are plenty of local walks including Stanley Ghyll waterfall. 

Station facilities include a viewing turntable, licensed café, gift shop, accessible toilets, and an outdoor children's play area. 

Ravenglass Map Outline

Ravenglass Station

Muncaster Mill

Miteside Halt

Murthwaite Halt

Irton Road

The Green

Fisherground Halt

Beckfoot

Dalegarth for Boot

Ravenglass Railway Map
  • Ravenglass Station
  • Muncaster Mill
  • Miteside Halt
  • Murthwaite Halt
  • Irton Road
  • The Green
  • Fisherground Halt
  • Beckfoot
  • Dalegarth for Boot

Ravenglass Station

Ravenglass is the only coastal village located in two World Heritage sites, Lake District National Park and Frontiers of the Roman Empire. 

Station facilities include a viewing turntable, licensed café, gift shop, accessible toilets, a museum with interactive exhibits, children’s activity boxes and an outdoor children's play area. 

Take a ten-minute walk to view Ravenglass Roman Bath House which is known as ‘Walls Castle.’

Muncaster Mill

This water-powered corn mill is believed to date back to 1455. It is now a private residence. There are great views over the coastal estuary from here. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets will be available from here - cash only. 

Miteside Halt

This station is referred to as a “halt”. A “halt” in railway parlance is a small station with little or no facilities. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only.

Murthwaite Halt

This station is referred to as a “halt”. A “halt” in railway parlance is a small station with little or no facilities. It once serviced the Murthwaite stone crushing plant, which was formed in the 1920s to crush the granite from the quarries in the valley.

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only.

Irton Road

Formerly known as Hollowstones, after a nearby farmstead, the present building dates to 1876. It is the only original station building still in existence constructed from pink granite and red sandstone. 

This stop is a popular starting point for two of Wainwright’s walks that start and finish here, including Miterdale. This is a route favoured by Wainwright that takes in one of ‘Lakeland’s sweetest valleys’.  

The Green

There are many walks to suit all abilities that start here including Burnmoor Tarn, Scafell, Scafell Pike, and Blea Tarn via Hollin How. This station was first known as King of Prussia but during the First World War, it changed its name to Eskdale Green. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only. 

Fisherground Halt

This station is referred to as a “halt”. A “halt” in railway parlance is a small station with little or no facilities. There is a campsite here with excellent facilities for campers and tourers so you can stay a little longer. 

Please note this is a request stop but the train will only stop if there is space on board. Please observe station signage. Only single tickets are available - cash only.

Beckfoot

This station was not part of the original line; it first opened when the railway became a preserved railway in 1960. 

Today, it is mainly used by walkers wishing to explore the fells and the exquisite nearby Blea Tarn, one of Wainwright's “Walks from Ratty”. Blea Tarn nestles on a granite shoulder at an altitude of 217m (712ft) under the slopes of Blea Tarn Hill. 

Dalegarth for Boot

The station lies within sight of England’s highest mountains, the Scafell range. It has not always been the terminus of the line, as the railway originally hauled iron ore from Nab Gill Mine. The remains of the rope worked inclined railway can be seen just to the left of the Boot Inn. 

It’s just a short walk into the village where you will find the Eskdale Mill. There are plenty of local walks including Stanley Ghyll waterfall. 

Station facilities include a viewing turntable, licensed café, gift shop, accessible toilets, and an outdoor children's play area. 

History

The Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway is one of the oldest and longest narrow gauge railways in England. It is affectionately and locally known as ‘La’al Ratty’, which means ‘little railway’ in olde Cumbrian dialect. The line was originally built in 1873 and boasts a fascinating history.

History of the Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway

Things to do

We're the heritage attraction with lots to see and do! A journey on our Lake District narrow gauge railway line is just the beginning of your adventure. From taking a step back in time at the fascinating Ravenglass Railway Museum to exploring the area's scenic walking and cycling trails, there are activities for the whole family to enjoy.

Things to do near ravenglass

Our Steam Engines

Engine: River Irt

Year of Build: 1894

Wheel Arrangement: 0-8-2

Length: 22ft

Colour: Green

Engine: River Esk

Year of Build: 1923

Wheel Arrangement: 2-8-2

Length: 22ft

Colour: Black

Engine: River Mite

Year of Build: 1966

Wheel Arrangement: 2-8-2

Length: 22ft

Colour: Red

Engine: Northern Rock

Year of Build: 1976

Wheel Arrangement: 2-6-2

Length: 22ft

Colour: Muscat Green

Engine: Whillan Beck

Year of Build: 1929

Wheel Arrangement: 4-6-2

Length: 22ft

Colour: Blue

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